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Nc intro 960

You should check out a new YouTube channel – Third Coast Craftsman – created by Chris Schoenberg of Michigan, home of the “Third Coast.” His videos inspire, entertain and educate. The high-quality and diversity of his work make watching his productions a pleasure.

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Damascuspattern

What is special about Japanese tools that sets them apart from their western counterparts? Five qualities come to mind: tradition, tool design that offers centuries of tried and proven use, unmatched craftsmanship, the steel used, and, of course, the pure beauty of the tools.


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Kanna

The Japanese Kanna or smoothing plane is a pull-style tool with a heavy-duty blade designed for efficiency and using the body to control and operate it.

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Planetuning

Scott Phillips and Phil Fuentes demonstrate Japanese hand plane tuning and the accessory tools to accomplish the task of a finely tuned plane. Featured are Iwasaki files and the Matusi straight-edge, available at Japan Woodworker.

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Japaneseplanes

Scott Phillips of The American Woodshop on PBS interviews Phil Fuentes of Japan Woodworker in an overview of Japanese woodworking hand planes.

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Robwoodriverplanes

WoodRiver Planes are based on the reliable Bedrock design and feature heavy, stress-relieved, ductile iron castings, fully machined adjustable frogs and high carbon steel blades. We took the opportunity between manufactring runs to conduct a critical review and incorporate a few improvements. These handplanes are an extraordinary value.

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The traditional Japanese craftsman rarely uses sandpaper or finish. The plane is the last tool used to prepare the surface of the wood or timber. Using the best quality plane, tuned for optimal cutting, is imperative for a smooth finish. 

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A guide to setting up, sharpening and using Lie Nielsen Bench Planes.

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The first time user should be aware that Kanna do not arrive from the maker ready for use. All best quality Japanese plane bodies (Dai) are made from select, air-dried Japanese Red Oak (Akagashi) or Japanese White Oak (Shirogashi). When the planes come from Japan to the drier U.S. climate some shrinkage occurs. Actually, shrinkage also occurs in Japan, and the Japanese woodworker expects to adjust or "condition" his plane.

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